Tag Archives: Canon

Life after central Texas flooding

Early this year parts of the Texas Hill Country were in the most severe category of soil moisture drought – “exceptional” – for the first time since February 2012.

We can remember however as recently as 2010 when lake levels around Texas were near all time high levels, more than 50 feet higher than they were in the first part of this year. It was more than five years ago when Lake Travis was completely full. Contrast that with April when Lake Travis was less than a few feet from its all-time low.

Wimberley bridgeBlanco River bridge at Wimberley, TX, Memorial Day, 2015. Photo by Jay Janner, Austin American Statesman.

Change came quickly and with devastation this Spring as weather conditions brought record conditions. May 2015 became the wettest May and the wettest month on record for the lower 48 states dating to 1895, according to the State of the Climate report released by the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Record rainfall ripped through parts of South Central Texas over the Memorial Day weekend causing flooding and displacing thousands of people.

In Austin extremely heavy rainfall on May 25 dumped 5.20 inches of rain at Camp Mabry, lifting Austin to its wettest May. The month’s rain tally was 17.59 inches, making it by far the wettest May on record since 1895.

The welcome and much-needed rain came with a serious price — severe flooding and catastrophic devastation. The Memorial Day weekend storms, combined with more rain from Tropical Depression Bill, brought widespread flooding to Texas, killing more than 30 people and resulting in flooding that damaged thousands of homes and other structures.

After the floodwater subsided, I had the chance to conduct a macro photography session with a friend and student, Nancy Norman. We went to a wooded  roadside parcel on the banks for the Blanco River near the town of Blanco, Texas. This is the same Central Texas stream that rose more than 43 feet above normal, wiping out several bridges, destroying more than 800 homes and resulting in the deaths of ten people in the Wimberley area.

P1010910

Our purpose was far from photographing flood damage, but to photograph the life thereafter. And we were quite successful. We found many birds, reptiles, amphibians, insects, lichens and fungi in the wake of destruction. As we were focusing on macro, we concentrated on insects, and fungi.

20150622_082646
Hundreds of cave swallow nests line the concrete structure of one of the bridges destroyed over the Blanco. Photo © Nancy Norman.

_MG_9752-blanco.mush

A small, yet perfect mushroom arises from the stem of a Possum grape vine on the river bank.

_MG_9756-cicada.blanco A small, recently emerged Rush cicada found near the water’s edge.

20150622_102310

Nancy concentrates on several small groups of mushrooms. Her equipment includes Canon 70D, 100mm macro and 430 EX Speedlite flash, all on a tripod with ball head and Mike Kirk flash bracket.

All together we had a good morning. Lots of good images were made successfully. We also learned that Mother Nature rebounds quickly. Life goes on.

Copyright © 2015 Brian Loflin. All rights reserved.

Advertisements

Laguna Seca Ranch Workshop Update

Pyrrhuloxia-in-the-Rain---Mailable
Five intrepid photographers braved somewhat unpleasant weather at my South Texas Bird Photography Workshop February 27 through March 1. Temperatures at Laguna Seca Ranch dipped into the low forties with drizzle and fog but did not keep the team from making some good images. A great feature about this ranch is that the blinds are cozy, being partially underground and protected from the wind.

Regardless of the weather, the birds performed for us in remarkable numbers. Our latest rough count lists thirty species in front of our lenses. We had lots of Crested Caracaras, Turkey Vultures and Harris Hawk at the raptor blind for most of a morning, providing ample shooting of each species. The smaller birds did not disappoint either. Many of the species were developing their breeding plumage; Pyrrhuloxia, Cardinals, and Green Jays were in brilliant color.

Golden-Fronted-Woodpecker-Mailable

A benefit in shooting from the below-ground blinds was the increased time available to practice shooting birds in flight. Perches and feeders were set to optimize flight time near the camera. This was a new skill for some participants however the time was well spent. I have received some very nice participant images like this male Pyrrhuloxia:

Dolph-Laguna Seca 3-484

And this Crested Caracara:DSC_0156-Rd

And this female Red-wing Blackbird:DSC_6440-Edit2

Water features and a a variety of perches provided diverse looks for many of the images created.

_B1A2059

DSC_4886-Edit

_B1A0839

Green Jay Bathing

Laguna Seca Ranch is a wonderful facility for bird photographers regardless of the experience level. Each blind has space for six seated photographers at eye level with the birds, well planned backgrounds and a water feature with built-in dripper system. Perches are set about 12 to 15 feet in front of the lens providing a reasonable image size without super telephotos. A favorite lens at this facility has become the 80-400 mm or 100-400mm lenses provided by both Nikon and Canon. And when coupled to a compatible tele-converter, this flexibility in focal length gives excellent  environmental or bird-in-flight images as well as frame-filling images of even smaller sparrows.

DSC_9030-Rd

New dates are set for Fall 2051 and Spring 2016 workshops.

Those are:

October 30-November 1, 2015, and

March 17-20, 2016.

To reserve one of the six spots before they are gone, email me: bkloflin@austin.rr.com.

Copyright © 2015 Brian Loflin. All rights reserved.

All photographs Copyright © 2015 by their respective makers.