Category Archives: Teaching

Frederick J. Bremner Charitable Trust paves the path to Professional Wildlife Photography at Texas A&M University-Kingsville.

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Principals attending the launch meeting of the CKWRI Wildlife Photography Program include, (from left) Brian Loflin, CKWRI Wildlife Photography Program Founder and Instructor; Sandy Hurwitz, Bremner Trustee; Janell and Tio Kleburg, CKWRI Advisory Board members; Leslee Hurwitz and McKayla Donovan, Del Rio Veterinary Services; April Conkey, Assistant Professor, Department of Animal, Rangeland, and Wildlife Sciences; Clay Hilton, CKWRI Director of Veterinary Technology; David Hewitt, and Executive Director of Caesar Kleburg Wildlife Research Institute. Also attending the meeting were Scott Henke, Chair, Department of Animal, Rangeland, and Wildlife Sciences, and Shad Nelson – Dean, Dick and Mary Lewis Kleberg College of Agriculture, Natural Resources and Human Sciences.

Brackettville, Tex.- October 2, 2017

A new program for Wildlife/Biology majors at Texas A&M University-Kingsville (TAMUK) has been implemented by a generous donation from the Frederick J. Bremner Charitable Trust. The program includes a thirty-hour course of study in biological and wildlife photography, classroom and laboratory equipment and professional digital cameras and accessories for student use when enrolled. When fully established, this academic program will be the only one of its kind within a university setting in the United States.

Bremner Trustee Sandy Hurwitz said, “The trust was charged in finding a home for this donation in the center of a robust educational environment that can make a difference in habitat understanding and outdoor utilization. We believe that TAMUK is the perfect home for this program and we want to make TAMUK the unquestioned world leader in Wildlife Photography and Eco Tourism. As an educator, mentor and outdoorsman, Fred Bremner would be exceptionally thrilled with this new program.”

Dr. Fred Bremner, professor emeritus of psychology at San Antonio’s Trinity University, died June 30, 2016 at 80 years of age. A specialist in the relationship between the brain and behavior, Bremner joined the Trinity faculty in 1965 as an associate professor. Promoted to full professor in 1974, he served twice as chair of the Department of Psychology before retiring in 1999.

Dr. Bremner had a great love for horses and the outdoors and enjoyed teaching his students to ride, hunt, train bird dogs, and fish. He established the Frederick J Bremner Charitable Trust to continue his life’s work in promoting these passions.

Housed within the Caesar Kleburg Wildlife Research Institute at TAMUK, the new Wildlife Photography Program will provide students in the Bachelors, Masters and Doctorate programs an additional avenue to enhance their professional career through biological and wildlife photography. The purpose of the grant is to address the need to educate current and future students at the university level to serve the fast-growing needs of the millions of people in Texas and globally who are traveling to enjoy and photograph wildlife and nature.

The students will learn to make our public parks, private ranches, urban greenbelts, wildlife preserves and other wild places accessible and productive for wildlife photographers while preserving and enhancing the environment of the open spaces that the increasing number of ecotourists and photographers are utilizing. Every one of us that goes out into the field to photograph birds and wildlife clearly understands the need for more and better venues to enjoy our passion. The ultimate goal is to promote the Conservation and enjoyment of our Natural Environment through photography and ecotourism.

TAMUK is one of the most active and respected research universities in the world in the discipline of Wildlife Science. As a tool for research in the natural sciences, Digital photography is a tool on the cutting edge in providing new methods and practices in measurement, analysis and integrity in publication. As a tool in ecology and the environment, digital photography is very effective in attracting more people to the outdoors to better understand and appreciate our wild places. Wildlife photography also stimulates eco-business and nature tourism on a large scale beyond the scope of biological science.

These programs in wildlife photography and ecotourism will produce TAMUK graduates that will fill thousands of entirely new, well-compensated, high-quality professional jobs in rural Texas, and rural America that are not exportable to China, India or downtown Dallas.

 

For more information, please contact:

Dr. Sandy Hurwitz, Trustee, or                      Brian K. Loflin,

Phone: 512-751-8128                                     512-743-7009

Email: ausvetdiag@aol.com                          bkloflin@austin.rr.com

 

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Fall photography workshops approaching

Four photography workshops are approaching fast. Each have just a few spots available.

For more information and to reserve your spot before they are gone, please visit the website at http://www.thenatureconnection.com/workshopschedule.html  .

2017 Workshop PromoB

Copyright © 2017 Brian Loflin. All rights reserved.

Life after central Texas flooding

Early this year parts of the Texas Hill Country were in the most severe category of soil moisture drought – “exceptional” – for the first time since February 2012.

We can remember however as recently as 2010 when lake levels around Texas were near all time high levels, more than 50 feet higher than they were in the first part of this year. It was more than five years ago when Lake Travis was completely full. Contrast that with April when Lake Travis was less than a few feet from its all-time low.

Wimberley bridgeBlanco River bridge at Wimberley, TX, Memorial Day, 2015. Photo by Jay Janner, Austin American Statesman.

Change came quickly and with devastation this Spring as weather conditions brought record conditions. May 2015 became the wettest May and the wettest month on record for the lower 48 states dating to 1895, according to the State of the Climate report released by the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Record rainfall ripped through parts of South Central Texas over the Memorial Day weekend causing flooding and displacing thousands of people.

In Austin extremely heavy rainfall on May 25 dumped 5.20 inches of rain at Camp Mabry, lifting Austin to its wettest May. The month’s rain tally was 17.59 inches, making it by far the wettest May on record since 1895.

The welcome and much-needed rain came with a serious price — severe flooding and catastrophic devastation. The Memorial Day weekend storms, combined with more rain from Tropical Depression Bill, brought widespread flooding to Texas, killing more than 30 people and resulting in flooding that damaged thousands of homes and other structures.

After the floodwater subsided, I had the chance to conduct a macro photography session with a friend and student, Nancy Norman. We went to a wooded  roadside parcel on the banks for the Blanco River near the town of Blanco, Texas. This is the same Central Texas stream that rose more than 43 feet above normal, wiping out several bridges, destroying more than 800 homes and resulting in the deaths of ten people in the Wimberley area.

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Our purpose was far from photographing flood damage, but to photograph the life thereafter. And we were quite successful. We found many birds, reptiles, amphibians, insects, lichens and fungi in the wake of destruction. As we were focusing on macro, we concentrated on insects, and fungi.

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Hundreds of cave swallow nests line the concrete structure of one of the bridges destroyed over the Blanco. Photo © Nancy Norman.

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A small, yet perfect mushroom arises from the stem of a Possum grape vine on the river bank.

_MG_9756-cicada.blanco A small, recently emerged Rush cicada found near the water’s edge.

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Nancy concentrates on several small groups of mushrooms. Her equipment includes Canon 70D, 100mm macro and 430 EX Speedlite flash, all on a tripod with ball head and Mike Kirk flash bracket.

All together we had a good morning. Lots of good images were made successfully. We also learned that Mother Nature rebounds quickly. Life goes on.

Copyright © 2015 Brian Loflin. All rights reserved.

Meet Austin Artist, Shakti Sarkin

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A few weeks ago I had the pleasure to photograph my artist friend and previous photography student, Shakti Sarkin. I was invited to do so with some of her new abstract art in progress. She is developing a very interesting theme around trees and water. In the images may also be found additional forms that really stimulate the imagination.

As my followers may know, this is a big departure for me as my work is predominantly natural science. Never the less, I got a big thrill in making this portrait. I must admit I had a little preconceived idea as to how I wanted to work.

The portrait is in front of a window to our left with indirect light from an overcast day. In addition, I place a much diffused Nikon SB-910 Speedlight on a stand high and to the camera right using a lot of the ceiling as fill.

I believe these types of images must be created with much care to reproduce the artist’s colors and skin tones accurately. I used a Color Checker Passport to get white balance, color and exposure values down correctly. This is a tool that I use regularly in my natural science work and it makes great sense to do so with this type of work as well. The image was post processed primarily in Lightroom and in Photoshop CC.

To see more of Shakti’s inspirational art, visit her web site at: shaktisart.com.

Copyright © 2015 Brian Loflin. All rights reserved.
Artwork © Shakti Sarkin.

Do you know what this is?

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You should!
It’s a Color Checker Passport (or CCP) !

If you are not familiar with this device you are missing a great tool for calibrating exposure, white balance and accurate color with one or two clicks in the computer. And in any light. Never more do you need to guess at how the subject looked at the time of exposure.

It works in two ways: First, it may be used to establish a camera, lens, light profile for use in Photoshop, Lightroom or other software. You may establish these profiles for standard lighting situations that you may encounter such as daylight, studio flash or your favorite Speedlight and/or softbox combination.

When first photographed it may look like this:

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In the computer software, use the ACR eyedropper tool to set white balance then set mid-tone, black and white values using the palette squares provided. Then save the file as a camera profile in your preferred post processing software. A bit of software is provided by the CCP from Xrite to do this.

Once the profile is loaded into your software, open the set of images you wish to adjust, click on the profile and voila, one or many more images can be simultaneously set.

Second, without a profile, white balance, tone values and color may still be set using the standard palette squares for any image and synchronized to a batch photographed in the same conditions.

With one click, this image:

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Can be processed into this:

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And with a little cropping, dust removal, dodging and burning you are all set! And the good thing- white balance, tone values and color are all standardized. No guessing or trying to remember how the subject and scene looked. Because our eyes play tricks on us and because people don’t see color the same, this makes our photography accurate.

If we want true-to-life accuracy, this is the tool to use.

Copyright © 2015 Brian Loflin. All rights reserved.

Photograph South Texas Specialties & Fall Migrants

Workshop Dates:  October 30 – November 1, 2015

Goluch Jays
Image by participant, © Richard Goluch.

Join noted photographer Brian Loflin for a highly instructional, hands-on bird photography workshop in the heart of the South Texas flyway. The workshop features a half-day of full, hands-on instruction and three half-days of shooting in some of the best South Texas birding habitat available where the neotropical South Texas varieties abound. Take a moment to view participant images from previous workshops here:

The workshop will be held at the Laguna Seca Ranch north of Edinburg, Texas in the heart of the lush Rio Grande Valley. Features of this 700-acre ranch are purpose-designed for photography and preserved with all-native plants and animals. It features four constant-level ponds, each with permanent photography blinds oriented for the best use of light. Each location has been hand-crafted, and they all provide outstanding birding and photographing opportunities. Nearly eighty species have been listed on the ranch. Laguna Seca Ranch clearly offers a unique South Texas birding and photography adventure!

At Laguna Seca Ranch we bring the birds to you! We will set up natural perches considering the best photographic light possible. Most photography of the best scenarios is just 12-15 feet from your lens! Birds have water, dripping attractions and are fed year-round so attraction of the best species is stress-free.

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Image by Participant, © Dolph McCranie.

This workshop is designed for serious photographers who are competent in the use of their camera and equipment, yet may not have experienced the thrill of producing bird photographs of the highest quality. Copious instruction will include hands-on demonstrations in bird photography, understanding best exposures and camera settings, and the use of flash. Instruction will also include how to set up in a blind and shooting etiquette, setting up perches, best management of backgrounds and light and much more.

“Brian put so much work into this workshop, it was amazing! He took care of absolutely everything that you could imagine, meals, lodging, bird attracting set up, and always making sure that we were comfortable. At times there were so many birds around us, you didn’t know which shot to take first. We all had a great time, and I am ready to go back again! ” –C.C. – Austin, Texas

For more information see:  RGV Bird Workshop
or, Email direct to:   bkloflin@austin.rr.com

Copyright © 2015 Brian Loflin. All rights reserved.

Nature & Macro in the Texas Hill Country

Join me at Mo Ranch in the very heart of the magical Texas Hill Country for a three-day nature and macro photography workshop geared to shooting in field settings and indoors. Dates are Friday-Sunday, September 18-20, 2015.

This workshop will be packed with hands-on instruction to help you grow your photographic abilities with new found skills, techniques and proficiency. Two nights lodging and six meals provided.

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The historic, 500 acre Mo Ranch is located in a beautiful setting on the North Fork of the Guadalupe River. Here, habitats include: aquatic, riparian areas, grasslands, oak-juniper woodlands, and limestone hills. We will make use of all of them.

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The workshop will feature classroom instruction, hands-on learning, and computer demonstrations  with native flora and fauna of the area. A computer lab is available for all participants for processing images. The workshop will cover many subjects including discussions on:

•    Equipment for getting close   •    Wide Angle Close-Ups
•    Backgrounds   •    Tools to make macro work easier
•    Lighting with Flash & High Speed Flash
•    High Key and White Box
     •    Macro Panorama
•    Extreme Macro   •    Focus Stacking

For more information, visit my website: Nature-Macro Workshop 
Or, E-mail me direct: bkloflin@austin.rr.com  .

Copyright © 2015 Brian K Loflin. All rights reserved.